Santa on Small Kinmen

Written by Ross Busch 比儒實 Friday, 15 January 2016 11:52
      On December 25th, I celebrated Christmas without my family for the first time. I felt a little uncomfortable, and a little homesick. I’m teaching English on a smaller island off the small island of Kinmen in Taiwan. Never before had I been asked to work during the holidays, and I wasn’t quite sure how I was going to manage both my responsibilities to plan Christmas events for my students and to celebrate with my family.      Rather than decorating the Christmas tree and drinking eggnog at home, I was carefully honing my social juggling skills. I…

Afternoon at The Getty

Written by Yann-Ru Ho 何彥如 Friday, 11 September 2015 14:17
       It was a sunny afternoon when I visited the Getty Museum in Los Angeles. I took a bus to the foot of the hill where it is situated, and then I lined up for the tram to take me up the hill. The Getty is a museum that was transformed into a public gallery; before, it was part of a private collection of Mr. J. Paul Getty.      The tram that took me uphill was very interesting and environmentally friendly. It used no gas or any other external energy: it used physics that worked a pulley…
Preface      This paper is not a formal academic one. It is a paper which is based upon my first-hand experiences and reflections which I have gained since I arrived at Cornell University on September 2, 2014. By “first-hand,” I mean “authentic and genuine:” I attribute these experiences to the people, the buildings, the facilities, and the natural and cultural environments while feeling and observing them on campus in both tangible and intangible perspectives. This is my very first time ever visiting Cornell University, one of the eight Ivy League Universities in the northeastern part of the US, founded…

Top Five Highlights of a Year in Taiwan

Written by Kirsten Asdal 艾永勤 Wednesday, 26 August 2015 16:04
    Top ten lists are everywhere these days. As readership moves online, and as viewership becomes more dependent on a catchy title to encourage a curious click, writers have become adept at condensing regular material into this appealing format.       One of my favorites this year was a Foreign Policy piece by Stephen Walt entitled “How to Get a B.A. in International Relations in 5 minutes.” In a few paragraphs that take no more than five minutes to read, Walt lays out key concepts that a student of IR would actually remember five years after graduation, like…

Last Fragment from a Taiwan Notebook: Traffic, Turn Signals, Fate

Written by Robert Siegel 席博安 Wednesday, 26 August 2015 13:44
     A day or two after our arrival in Taiwan, my family and I stood at the edge of the narrow road just outside the college campus where we now lived, wondering how to cross the street. There was no traffic light, no crosswalk, no sidewalk, and no break in the traffic, which was made up almost entirely of motor scooters. Coming from America, land of the Humvee and the monster truck, a motor scooter sounds like a child’s toy, but a torrent of them is actually pretty scary. We watched for a while, looking for a gap in…

My Fulbright Experience at Eleanor Roosevelt College at the University of California, San Diego

Written by Chiung-Tao Shen 沈瓊桃 Monday, 30 March 2015 18:53
         I was very pleased and honored to receive the prestigious research grant as a Fulbright Senior Scholar in 2014. It represents a wonderful opportunity to obtain new knowledge in the field of child protection in the United States. My research grant will let me help children in need in Taiwan after I finish my research project. This paper contains reflections on my stay in the US as a Fulbright Senior Scholar over the past 6 months.   Research Experiences      I am very grateful that Professor Richard Madisen, the acting provost of the Eleanor Roosevelt College…

Reflections on Illiteracy

Written by Emily Quade 奎艾蜜 Monday, 30 March 2015 18:46
  “My mother said I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy. That some people, unable to go to school, were more educated and more intelligent than college professors.” ―M. Angelou        One challenge that I didn't understand in its entirety when I accepted my grant to come to Taiwan was what it is like to be illiterate.  There are many things in life that we take for granted, and sometimes, it takes the absence of something to really understand that concept. For example, when you are sick with a cold and you are so congested…

My Fulbright Experiences at University of Minnesota

Written by Yu-Hui Chang 張宇慧 Monday, 23 March 2015 11:45
       As a Fulbright Taiwan grantee, I always feel honored to introduce my country and discuss culturaldifferences whenever I meet people. When I attended a three-week Fulbright pre-academic program, which was sponsored by Fulbright IIE at Virginia Tech, I met Fulbright grantees from 26 countries. We not only shared our diverse cultures, but also learned about American culture and academic preparation together. It was a time to effacestereotypes and rethink questions of culture and mutual respect; most importantly, it was the time to try to understand other voices. From religiousto political issues, from culinary habits to the educational…

Conversations: Names, Mingling, and Speaking Up

Written by Yann-Ru Ho 何彥如 Friday, 13 March 2015 13:12
       When I first arrived here in the United States to pursue graduate studies, I not only noticed the language difference, but also the unfamiliar conversation conventions. I realized that many conversations here operate according to a different communication style than what I was used to back home. Here in LA, I have found that many people greet others warmly and openly, even strangers. Since my arrival here, I have been greeted by cashiers, sales clerks, and bus drivers; even pedestrians on the streets usually greet me with a smile. This happens less often back home.    …

My Reflections

Written by Randall Nadeau, Jennie Farris Railey King Professor in Religion, Trinity University Tuesday, 03 March 2015 12:22
      Taiwan is a welcoming, multicultural environment offering wonderful opportunities to international scholars. I have known Taiwan for 30 years, having first come at age 28 to teach English for a summer at the Tainan YMCA, and returning a year later for Chinese language study at the Stanford Center at National Taiwan University.  After earning my PhD in East Asian Studies from the University of British Columbia in 1990, I have made several more trips to Taiwan:  as a research scholar at Academia Sinica in the summer of 1996, as a guest professor of history at National Chengkung University…
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