Wild, Tame, and In-Between: Traditional Agricultural Knowledge of Taiwan Indigenous People

Written by Pei-Lin Yu余琲琳 Wednesday, 23 August 2017 12:30
  INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND Many of us would agree that Senator J. William Fulbright’s vision of “a world with a little more knowledge and a little less conflict” will feature healthy ecosystems, appreciation of cultural diversity, and of course, delicious food. However, the world has been moving in the wrong direction over the past century. Today, 75% of the world’s plant food is made up of only 12 species. As of 2010, three (rice, maize, and wheat) provided nearly 60 percent of the calories and proteins that humans derive from plants (F.A.O 2010, 1999) and this trend continues (Khoury et…

I Am Who I Think I Am: On Finding My Identity in Taiwan

Written by Yin-Han Karissa Chen 陳盈涵 Wednesday, 23 November 2016 15:14
    “Where are you from?” is a question almost every Asian American has grown up hearing (in addition to its ruder close cousin — “What are you?”).    I've bristled at that question, swinging from being patient and polite — “You mean where are my parents from?”— to snarky — “New Jersey.” It's a question that rankles because it assumes foreignness and otherness, one that, in my own country, feels unfair. In America, aren't we almost all, in some shape or form, descended from somewhere else? And yet Asian Americans are usually the ones perpetually called out for it.…

Facebook, Busy Weekends, and Young Startups in the Sharing City

Written by Jeffrey Hou侯志仁 Wednesday, 23 November 2016 14:24
   I arrived in Taipei in late June of 2015 to begin my sabbatical leave and my Fulbright research focusing on the “sharing city,” part of a phenomenon that is going on worldwide. From Europe to Asia, activities such as food sharing, co-working, and all forms of commoning are redefining social relationships in cities as well as how urban spaces can be used, activated, and transformed. Specifically, I am interested in how these activities are organized and by whom, as well as the broader implications for city-making.       This time around, my research approach was quite simple. I happen…

A Unique edition of Shishuo xinyu

Written by Evan Nicoll Johnson 倪意文 Monday, 07 November 2016 11:48
         My research is primarily concerned with texts produced and circulated in the early medieval period from roughly the second to the seventh centuries CE, or the period from the late Han dynasty through the beginning of the Tang dynasty. Warfare and political turmoil typically characterize the era in between these two powerful dynasties. Considered a complicated and unstable time, this time period also witnessed a period of great innovation in terms of literature, historiography, and scholarship. In the simplest terms, the quantity and variety of texts in circulation increased rapidly. Studying the way these and other…
       Kaohsiung is the second largest city in Taiwan. It is also Taiwan’s hub of heavy industry and a world-class port. The Twenty-five Ladies’ Tomb was the collective burial site of female workers who drowned during a ferry accident on their way to work at Kaohsiung’s export processing zones in 1973. Of the seventy plus passengers on board, all twenty-five who died were unmarried young women. Taiwanese culture shuns unmarried female ghosts who have no (husband’s) ancestral hall to rest in peace. This made the tomb a fearsome place. The Kaohsiung Association for the Promotion of Women’s Rights…

An Exploratory Study on Tourist Personality and Travel Preferences

Written by Li-Yu Lee 李梨瑜 Friday, 13 May 2016 12:00
Introduction       Although the classic marketing idiom says that marketing is “the battle for your mind” (Ries and Trout, 1981), research on tourist personality in relation to travel preferences is quite limited. According to Leung & Law (2010), there are 169 research articles on personality covering a broad range of topics from human personality to brand personality. However, in the human personality area, the majority of topics focus on service staff. Current research on tourist personality is insufficient.          Most reports on tourist behavior are typological. The classifications are relatively arbitrary without supportive data. For…

Chinese Martial Arts Cinema in the 21st Century: from Wong Fei-hung to Huang Fei-hong

Written by Chiachi Wu 吳佳琪 Friday, 22 April 2016 14:15
( This manuscript is NOT a formally written paper and is NOT FOR CITATION in any form. )     The real Wong Fei-hung (WFH) was a celebrated martial artist, a physician, an herbalist, and a street performer. He belonged to the Hong Fist (洪拳) of the Southern Shaolin School (南少林) and was taught by his father, Wong Kei-ying (黃麒英). Wong Fei-hung’s legend was first popularized because of the serialized stories written by Zhu Yu-zhai in Hong Kong and published in newspapers in the 40s. In 1949, the first WFH film, True Story of Wong Fei-hung, (Huang feihong zhuan) was…

What the Taotao Means to Me

Written by Mary Hamilton 何美笑 Friday, 22 April 2016 11:38
     On Orchid Island, the Taotao is a ubiquitous symbol.  It can be found inside churches, outside of 7-11, adorning many a tourist trinket, and most importantly, on every Tao boat.  Known as (人型 renxing the person symbol), the Taotao is often depicted as a small person with swirled arms and “curly Qs” coming out of its head. Whimsical in appearance, but steeped in meaning, the Taotao represents a person’s relationship with his or her physical environment.  For Tao people, this environment includes dense mountainous jungle, rocky beaches, and the crystal blue expanse of the Pacific Ocean.        …

My Fulbright Journey in Taiwan: Language-Discordance as a Social Phenomenon

Written by Elaine Hsieh 謝怡玲 Friday, 22 April 2016 10:53
    Social worlds and social relationships are created, maintained, and resisted through human communication. The best of communication scholarship emerges through researchers’ willingness and ability to listen, by recognizing the perspectives of others, and learning through the nuances and complexities of communication practices. This is particularly important when working with marginalized and underserved populations, whose voices are often deprived and silenced, resulting in disparities in their everyday life. These are the values that have driven my research program for nearly two decades. Interests in and empathy for humans and the human phenomenon is fundamental to the scholarship of any…

Translation of “Enlightenment” in Late Qing and Republican China Political Thought

Written by Chien-Shou Chen 陳建守 Thursday, 30 April 2015 15:03
        My research as a Fulbright grantee at Harvard University concerns the appropriation of political terminology from the West in late Qing and Republican China. Here is a small section of my work, to give an idea of the research my Fulbright grant supports.         In recent research, LuoZhitian 羅志田 has argued that during the integration of Western culture, modern China showed some ambiguity in the translation and utilization of imported words. Most understanding towards European historical events took place either through literal translation or through definitionof the meanings of terms, such as “qimeng…
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