On the Road with Xuanzang

Written by Benjamin Brose 本博澤 Sunday, 13 April 2014 16:36
       The story I want to tell has a clear beginning but no clear end. It starts like this: On December 23, 1942,Takamori Takasuke, the commanding officer of Japanese soldiers stationed in Nanjing, was overseeing the construction of an Inari Shinto shrine just outside of the city’s southern gate. While excavating the shrine’s foundation, his men discovered the crypt of an old Buddhist pagoda. Inside a stone sarcophagus they found two nested boxes, the outer of bronze, the inner of silver. The inner box contained one small gold Buddha statue, several bronze and ceramic implements, hundreds of coins,…

Preliminary Reflections on the CKS Memorial Hall

Written by Charles Musgrove 莫林 Sunday, 13 April 2014 14:43
       The Fulbright Taiwan program is generously sponsoring my year of sabbatical research here in Taipei, where I am investigating the relationships between public spaces and the emergence of democracy.  I am interested in how Nationalist era symbols and rituals have been used on Taiwan from 1945 to the early 2000’s. Over this period, the Nationalist Party (the Kuomintang, or KMT) at first tried to use symbols and ceremonies developed on the mainland to turn former Japanese colonial subjects into dutiful Chinese citizens loyal to the party’s “revolutionary” leadership. From the outset there was tension and violence between…

Teaching Philosophy in Taiwan

Written by Brian Bruya 柏嘯虎 Monday, 29 April 2013 16:20
       I am writing this while on a teaching Fulbright in the Department of Philosophy at National Taiwan University (NTU) in Taipei, during the 2012-2013 school-year. My duties are to teach one graduate class each semester. The first course was American Pragmatism and the second course Comparative Moral Psychology. In this essay, I will discuss how the content in these courses has been modified from similar courses I have taught in the States and what has happened as a result.          There are two basic things that distinguish my Taiwan students from my previous American…

Cultural Empowerment for Atayal Students

Written by Christine Yeh 葉晶 Wednesday, 27 March 2013 14:38
       Dr. Christine Yeh developed a cultural empowerment program in a 99% indigenous Atayal community in Yilan. In this video, she describes how she worked with the community and the teachers of the school to create a curriculum. In her educational program, which she describes as a "sustainable intervention", she emphasizes ethnic identity and educational opportunities for students. Dr. Yeh worked closely with Fulbright English Teaching Assistant (ETA), Mikael Owunna, and a local English teacher, Jennifer Huang. Results from the program and pieces of student work will be displayed in a 2014 exhibition in the National Taiwan Museum.…
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