An American Vegetarian in Taiwan

Written by Kimberly Wilson 金貝利 Friday, 23 January 2015 00:00
         The first time I came to Taiwan, I lived in Taipei for two months during the summer while I took Chinese classes at a local university. I was only here for a short time, so I never really developed any close friendships and spent much of the summer exploring Taipei by myself. As someone who has been a vegetarian for most of my life and does not generally enjoy cooking, I spent a great deal of my free time that summer hunting down vegetarian restaurants.        One day I was trying out a particularly…

Brief Thoughts on Living and Travelling in Taiwan

Written by Paul Vierthaler 李友仁 Tuesday, 10 February 2015 18:36
       My wife and I moved to Taipei with a certain amount of trepidation. The benefits were clear: she could take time off work to learn Chinese and all the materials that I would need to finish my dissertation were available. Yet it was a nerve-wracking prospect to spend nearly a year away from our dog, whom my father-in-law is looking after, in a place where only one of us spoke the language and neither of us had been. Now, ten months later, it was proven to be one of the best choices we could have made. We…

My Reflections

Written by Randall Nadeau, Jennie Farris Railey King Professor in Religion, Trinity University Tuesday, 03 March 2015 12:22
      Taiwan is a welcoming, multicultural environment offering wonderful opportunities to international scholars. I have known Taiwan for 30 years, having first come at age 28 to teach English for a summer at the Tainan YMCA, and returning a year later for Chinese language study at the Stanford Center at National Taiwan University.  After earning my PhD in East Asian Studies from the University of British Columbia in 1990, I have made several more trips to Taiwan:  as a research scholar at Academia Sinica in the summer of 1996, as a guest professor of history at National Chengkung University…

Reflections on Illiteracy

Written by Emily Quade 奎艾蜜 Monday, 30 March 2015 18:46
  “My mother said I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy. That some people, unable to go to school, were more educated and more intelligent than college professors.” ―M. Angelou        One challenge that I didn't understand in its entirety when I accepted my grant to come to Taiwan was what it is like to be illiterate.  There are many things in life that we take for granted, and sometimes, it takes the absence of something to really understand that concept. For example, when you are sick with a cold and you are so congested…

Last Fragment from a Taiwan Notebook: Traffic, Turn Signals, Fate

Written by Robert Siegel 席博安 Wednesday, 26 August 2015 13:44
     A day or two after our arrival in Taiwan, my family and I stood at the edge of the narrow road just outside the college campus where we now lived, wondering how to cross the street. There was no traffic light, no crosswalk, no sidewalk, and no break in the traffic, which was made up almost entirely of motor scooters. Coming from America, land of the Humvee and the monster truck, a motor scooter sounds like a child’s toy, but a torrent of them is actually pretty scary. We watched for a while, looking for a gap in…

Top Five Highlights of a Year in Taiwan

Written by Kirsten Asdal 艾永勤 Wednesday, 26 August 2015 16:04
    Top ten lists are everywhere these days. As readership moves online, and as viewership becomes more dependent on a catchy title to encourage a curious click, writers have become adept at condensing regular material into this appealing format.       One of my favorites this year was a Foreign Policy piece by Stephen Walt entitled “How to Get a B.A. in International Relations in 5 minutes.” In a few paragraphs that take no more than five minutes to read, Walt lays out key concepts that a student of IR would actually remember five years after graduation, like…
Preface      This paper is not a formal academic one. It is a paper which is based upon my first-hand experiences and reflections which I have gained since I arrived at Cornell University on September 2, 2014. By “first-hand,” I mean “authentic and genuine:” I attribute these experiences to the people, the buildings, the facilities, and the natural and cultural environments while feeling and observing them on campus in both tangible and intangible perspectives. This is my very first time ever visiting Cornell University, one of the eight Ivy League Universities in the northeastern part of the US, founded…

Afternoon at The Getty

Written by Yann-Ru Ho 何彥如 Friday, 11 September 2015 14:17
       It was a sunny afternoon when I visited the Getty Museum in Los Angeles. I took a bus to the foot of the hill where it is situated, and then I lined up for the tram to take me up the hill. The Getty is a museum that was transformed into a public gallery; before, it was part of a private collection of Mr. J. Paul Getty.      The tram that took me uphill was very interesting and environmentally friendly. It used no gas or any other external energy: it used physics that worked a pulley…

Santa on Small Kinmen

Written by Ross Busch 比儒實 Friday, 15 January 2016 11:52
      On December 25th, I celebrated Christmas without my family for the first time. I felt a little uncomfortable, and a little homesick. I’m teaching English on a smaller island off the small island of Kinmen in Taiwan. Never before had I been asked to work during the holidays, and I wasn’t quite sure how I was going to manage both my responsibilities to plan Christmas events for my students and to celebrate with my family.      Rather than decorating the Christmas tree and drinking eggnog at home, I was carefully honing my social juggling skills. I…

Taiwan's Themes

Written by Teagan Adamson 艾婷安 Wednesday, 20 January 2016 16:48
     There is a theme of themes in Taiwan. Shopping areas are organized by theme, and restaurants are known by their brand. You can find numerous electronics shops and a five-story building dedicated to computers, cameras, cell phones, videogames, and their respective accessories on Bade Road. For everything related to cameras, Boai Road has been the popular location for over forty years. But if you’re looking for a professional photographer instead, then the streets around Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial Hall offer many options.         The themes don’t stop here—the busiest MRT stations in Taipei all have their own…