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Tag: China

Contents and Orientations of Chinese Nationalist Discourse

Chinese nationalism continues to be an important but inadequately understood phenomenon. On the one hand, it is evident that nationhood and national identity are deeply embedded in Chinese society. Polling conducted in 2005 and 2010 among the publics of thirteen Asian countries ranked PRC citizens first in positive feelings towards their nation.1 This unusually strong sense of national pride appears to be supported by a particularly nation-oriented worldview. In but one example, a 2008 survey showed that 84.3 percent of Chinese respondents agreed with the assertion, “Your country should pursue its national interest even if it could harm the interests of another.”2 This is not typical; as Linley notes, only about 40 percent of Japanese affirm such an “unconditional support” for their national interest.3      More importantly, China’s sense of nationhood appears to be highly salient at the individual level. More than four-fifths of PRC citizens polled in 2010 and 2014 agreed, “When other people criticize China, it is as though they are criticizing me.”4 As Dickson writes, “This is a clear indicator that the self-identity of many Chinese is intimately tied to their country.”5 So it was unsurprising when, in late May, a disparaging description of China’s air quality coupled with

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A Case of China’s Economic Power

A case study provides the opportunity to delve deeper into the perceived advantage that China wields over the United States in monetary power. By analyzing a real world case of Chinese monetary power, this research aims to answer the questions: when is economic coercive action in the Chinese-United States relationship likely to succeed, and why aren’t there more instances in which China tries to make use of its theoretical leverage. Over the course of the case studies, deeper analysis presents a more complex and complicated picture of the broader and more definitive areas of leverage presented in the analysis of economic realities. This suggests that theoretical advantage, while supported by economic figures, can often be hard to capitalize on in reality. In the case of China’s monetary power, this research makes use of “the most likely case” of economic coercive action (Eckstein, 1975). As such, this research aims to take a case of Chinese utilization of economic power that has a high likelihood of success and explore how successful it was in reality as well as what were the circumstances of its failure or success. This falls short of an all-out attempt to disprove the theoretical advantage, as is often

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China’s Elusive Nationhood: Ethnic, Cultural, and Civic Dimensions

     Despite the ahistorical claims of those who misread “nationhood” into the millennia of history in present day Greater China, a “Chinese Nation” is a fairly recent concept. As a political ideal, its roots are found in the writings of late Qing dynasty anti-Manchu and anti-imperialist intellectuals and revolutionaries. As a “reality,” it is no older than the 20th century, and a persuasive argument has been made that national consciousness reached much of China only in the 1950’s.1 Nonetheless, the influence of “Chinese nationhood” on both China and the world should not be underestimated.  The success of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in combining nationalism with anti-imperialism and anti-elitism is cited as an explanation for its civil war victory in 1949. 2 In the post-Maoism and post-global communism PRC, nationalism is cited by both Chinese leaders and outside observers as a primary pillar of regime security.      Indeed, as a cognitive political reality, Chinese nationhood seems to explain a lot.  But how does it explain itself? What are its contents? What are the values and norms embodied in the Chinese national image? Is it merely an ultra-realist and humiliation-minded ego of national scale? These questions are fascinating in part because

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Monica Yang: Determinants and Performance of Cross-border Mergers and Acquisitions

Dr. Yang compares characteristics and motives of cross-border Merger and Acquisitions (M&A) across the Strait and explores how firms are integrated after acquisitions. Dr. Monica Yang is Associate Professor of Business and Management at Adelphi University. As a Fulbright Senior Scholar at Department of International Business at National Chengchi University, she studiescross border M&A activities among Taiwan, China and Hong Kong.

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The Invisible Hand of Great Power Politics: China and United States Fight for Economic Supremacy in Asia

   It is widely accepted that the future of the world will rest in the hands of Chinese and U.S. world leaders. Both President Obama and President Xi have, on numerous occasions, voiced this sentiment. In 2013, in a joint press conference with Obama in California, President Xi said, “A sound China-U.S. cooperation can serve as the ballast for global stability and the propeller for world peace.”1  Their choice to cooperate (or not) will shape every global issue from nuclear weapons and terrorism to trade and technology.  This is the first great confrontation between great powers with profoundly different world views since the Cold War, and yet there is greater cooperation and negotiation between the two sides than that which existed between the United States and Soviet Union.        We have already seen how the complex relationship between the U.S. and China has shaped the internal economic workings of the two countries.  It is estimated that China now employs nearly one million Americans, and it is likely that America employs many more Chinese; furthermore, investment and foreign capital flows benefit both economies.2   Domestically, the impact of trade relations has already been shown and its benefits and drawbacks

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Beijing’s Formidable Strategy in the South China Sea

      The U.S. rebalance to Asia has yet to alter the desired outcome for U.S. allies and partners in the South China Sea (SCS): Checking Beijing’s advances in territorial claims. Instead, despite a few successful maneuvers, most of the strategies adopted by the Philippines and Vietnam have backfired. China has seized every opportunity to advance its claims in response to its neighbors’ perceived provocations and operational incompetence. Let us consider some examples of how SCS competitors act, react, and interact in the strategic pursuit of their own self-interests.

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A Rich and Fulfilling Fulbright Experience in Taiwan, China and Hong Kong

    This paper contains reflections on my stay in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China as a Fulbright Senior Scholar from May to July 2015.   Research-Wide Reflections      Because the Fulbright Scholar Award is prestigious in supporting activities and projects that promote educational exchange and international understanding, I have been able to identify and collect data and collaborate with researchers and business managers in Taiwan, China, and Hong Kong. Since my research topic focuses on mergers and acquisitions among companies in these three places, researchers and data in this area are scattered in multiple disciplines (e.g., business/management, political science, and sociology). It is challenging to conduct research in three different locations within three months, however, it is also extremely worthwhile to exchange ideas with people who are doing similar research or who are conducting business with real experience.      During my stay, I gave guest lectures to graduate students (approximately 60 students and 10 faculty members) where I shared my prior and ongoing research projects. I was also able to serve as a discussant and presenter giving an oral presentation in one international conference (Asia Academy of Management). Several comments and insights that people shared with me

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