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Mathematical Modeling: The Formosan Landlocked Salmon

Written by Laurie Battle, Professor of mathematics, Montana Tech Saturday, 28 February 2015 11:21
     In recent decades, dam removal has become a frequently-used strategy for restoring natural stream habitats because dams deteriorate river channels and often lead to decreased diversity of species. Taiwan has many short and steep rivers in the high mountains, where strong rainfall creates high water velocity. As a result, the government constructed many check dams to prevent the collapse of riverbanks and to lessen sediment transport to lower elevations. As of 1999, Taiwan had over 3,000 check dams.…

This Invitation

Written by Amber Kao Tuesday, 24 February 2015 20:00
“It began with an invitation from the Fulbright Program to spend a year in Taiwan and now an invitation for the audience to enter into the choreographer’s world: an invitation to dream, to wonder, to be innocent, to feel pain…to sacrifice, learn, re-learn, let go…to die, to live…”   Created as the culmination of her year as a Fulbrighter in Taiwan, this work titled This Invitation represents Amber Kao’s journey of returning to the country from which her family came,…

Smart Sensors for Safer Bridges: An International Collaborative Effort

Written by Kenneth Loh 羅健晃 Tuesday, 24 February 2015 19:52
  Bridge Scour      The erosion of soil, sand, and riverbed materials near bridge foundations due to flowing water (or wind in some cases) is a phenomenon known as bridge scour. Despite our awareness of its occurrence, bridge scour remains one of the deadliest causes of overwater bridge failures worldwide, particularly in the United States and in Taiwan.         For instance, a notable scour-induced bridge collapse in the United States was the Schoharie Creek Interstate Highway Bridge…

Chinese Buddhist Poetry and Academic Lineages in Taiwan: Part Two of Two

Written by Jason Protass, Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford University Tuesday, 24 February 2015 19:43
         In this two-part essay, I survey two important academic lineages in Taiwan and their contributions to the study of Chinese Buddhist poetry. In the first part, I focused on the cohort of scholars that worked and trained at National Chengchi University. In this second part, I examine the other major lineage. In addition to tracing the origins of this second group, I highlight some recent works and offer a more in-depth summary of their contents.  …

Chinese Buddhist Poetry and Academic Lineages in Taiwan: Part One of Two

Written by Jason Protass, Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford University Tuesday, 24 February 2015 19:28
         Chinese Buddhist poetry and literature remains largely unstudied in Western academia. The study of Buddhist poetry requires facility with the disparate fields of Chinese literature and Buddhist studies. These demands are a formidable challenge even for native speakers of East Asian languages. Nonetheless, several generations of East Asian scholars have made significant inroads into this field of inquiry. In this two-part essay, I will briefly outline two important academic lineages in Taiwan and their contributions to…

Personal Experiences and Reflections at University of Washington

Written by An-Tsu Chen 陳安祖 Friday, 13 February 2015 00:23
       This article aims to share my (academic) experiences at University of Washington, Seattle during the autumn quarter 2014. For 1st year PhD students in the Economics department, it is typical that almost all our efforts are invested in taking core courses and preparing for the qualifying exams. In other words, it’s good to have a research agenda, but students are encouraged to fully concentrate on core courses and exams. Therefore, I will take this opportunity to share…

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