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Month: October 2015

Diane Choi: “比真愛還好 (Still Better Than Love)” – Independent Filmmaking in Taipei

Diane Choi is a filmmaker who delves into what makes humans tick. She created a post-recession superhero in “Hero for Hire” (2015 Independent Days Filmfest), then shot Beijing’s migrant villages for the documentary “被流放 (Made to Wander).” Most recently she edited the Best Cinematography winner at the Tainan 39-Hour Short Film Contestival, “紅 (She Wore Red).”

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Terry O’Reilly: Contemporary Aboriginal. The Mixing.

With deep reverence for their cultures, Terry O’Reilly shares the journeys of an American playwright among the Saisiyat, Amis, Paiwan and Atayal peoples of Taiwan. Terry O’Reilly is an internationally active director, playwright and teacher. Co-artistic director of Mabou Mines Theater Company, New York, which has produced three of his plays: The Bribe, Animal Magnetism and Brer’ Rabbit in the Land of the Monkey King and soon to come The Sunshine Book written in Taiwan.

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Lance Crisler: The Rise of Fiction in the Legal Cases of Early China

Lance’s current project explores recently excavated legal manuscripts, which date to the Han and pre-Han period (~200 BCE). Lance’s research examines plot creation in these early legal case files to discover the larger implications of the early role of fiction in Chinese legal and historical narrative texts. Lance Crisler is a PhD Candidate at UCLA specializing in Early Chinese literature and historiography. He has spent the 2014-15 academic year researching at Academia Sinica.

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Mary Hamilton: Boat Building and the Role of the Boat in Tao Culture

Mary Hamilton’s research focuses on traditional boat building and its role in Tao culture, from the first meeting to decide to build a boat to its completion and ritual initiation. Mary Hamilton is a graduate of Fordham University. As a Fulbright Fellow at National Taitung University’s Department of Public and Cultural Affairs, she is researching boat building among the Tao indigenous people of Orchid Island from an anthropological perspective.

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Lance Crisler: The Rise of Fiction in the Legal Cases of Early China

Lance’s current project explores recently excavated legal manuscripts, which date to the Han and pre-Han period (~200 BCE). Lance’s research examines plot creation in these early legal case files to discover the larger implications of the early role of fiction in Chinese legal and historical narrative texts. Lance Crisler is a PhD Candidate at UCLA specializing in Early Chinese literature and historiography. He has spent the 2014-15 academic year researching at Academia Sinica.

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