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Tag: art

Exploring the Art and the Science at Stanford

If I had to use just one word to describe my year-long sabbatical leave as a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Stanford, it would be “fruitful” on both the art and the science fronts. The Science      I am a health economist and my research interests in recent years have focused on the economics of the health systems in the Asia-Pacific region. The Center for East Asian Studies and Dr. Karen Eggleston at the Asia Health Policy Program, Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford, have jointly hosted my visit from August 2015 to July 2016.      In light of the significance of chronic disease, a major driver to of cost growth, the main research question in my proposed study to be addressed is: that how does Taiwan tackle the management of chronic disease under National Health Insurance (NHI) compared to the other high-income economies in the Asia-Pacific? More specifically, two primary research goals in this research proposal are: (1) to assess “value for money” (productivity) of chronic disease management in different health system settings; and (2) to give evidence-based policy advice to help prepare healthcare systems for aging populations

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Afternoon at The Getty

     It was a sunny afternoon when I visited the Getty Museum in Los Angeles. I took a bus to the foot of the hill where it is situated, and then I lined up for the tram to take me up the hill. The Getty is a museum that was transformed into a public gallery; before, it was part of a private collection of Mr. J. Paul Getty. The tram that took me uphill was very interesting and environmentally friendly. It used no gas or any other external energy: it used physics that worked a pulley system that had two cars. As one car goes down the hill, its gravitational acceleration pulls the other one uphill. It was a very quiet tram ride except for the soft but clear words of welcome transmitted through the speaker. As the car ascended, LA became smaller and smaller. When the tram reached the top, I got off on one side, and passengers who were going downhill got on from the other side. It was a very efficient and non-crowded way of arranging the visitors. I felt like I was beginning to feel the effective management and friendly atmosphere of the Getty. What

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With Just One Action – Learning Chinese through the arts

Coming to Taiwan, I knew that not only would I be able to conduct advanced cancer therapy research, but also I would have many opportunities to improve my Chinese. I didn’t realize how hard performing both of these tasks simultaneously was going to be. During my graduate studies, I took a break from studying Chinese so it was a little rusty upon my arrival, and I was relatively shy when prompted to speak. After a few weeks in Taiwan, my Chinese quickly rose to the level of comfortable conversation and problem solving, mostly as a result of the classes I was taking a few times a week. Everyone in my lab is required to speak English – and because finding time to do homework isn’t easy when I could be out enjoying Taipei’s rich culture, I’ve relied on some of my other interactions instead. Everyday life has afforded me plenty of practice; before long I could order coffee like a pro and crack jokes with the locals, but I was still looking for ways to improve my level. Luckily, I stumbled across some great opportunities that have transformed my stay in Taiwan, and given me the time to study Chinese

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