Tag: English

Reflections on Taiwan

I am honored to have been included in the first Fulbright International Education Administrators Seminar in Taiwan.  I applied to this experience to enrich myself and to hopefully bring back ideas on how my university can send more students to Taiwan.  This seminar marks my first experience in an Asian country, and it was an opportunity of a lifetime to see life in Taiwan and to hear from locals about their home country and culture. I greatly enjoyed seeing how welcoming and open-minded the people I encountered were.  Especially when I do not know the language, I try to avoid being the stereotypical traveler who thinks that everyone knows my language.  So, I enjoyed the pantomiming and my (sometimes failed) attempts at interacting with people in markets, restaurants, and on the street.  I only had one time that I truly felt frustrated – and that was when I had already eaten a meal at the night market, and I was wanting to pay.  It shows how trusting Taiwanese people are when even with expressions and trying to hand over money, they thought I was wanting to order food, not pay for what I had already received.  Then there was the

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Reflections on the Fulbright International Education Administrators Grant to Taiwan

Reflections on the Fulbright International Education Administrators Grant to Taiwan My journey to the Fulbright IEA began in a meeting with some of the people in my International Office. A the time I was at Western Kentucky University (WKU), as the Associate Dean of my college. I dealt with all things having to do with off-campus travel, and in this meeting we discussed some international opportunities for faculty and students. One of the administrators present asked if I planned to apply for a Fulbright IEA. In all honesty I had not heard of the IEA program before that but in browsing, I could see that  some of the countries seemed to align with what we were doing here at WKU. Moreover, some of the timetables for applications and visits seemed to work out. Because it was the closest deadline, I initially applied for an IEA in Germany, but was not accepted. Taiwan was my original first choice, so I re-wrote my application, applied, and was accepted.  In fact, the notification of acceptance came while I was in Cuba working to establish connections with a couple of universities there. Cuba’s internet WiFi infrastructure is not reliable, so I was in a

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An Unexpected Journey: How I Became a Master’s Student in Taiwan

The Decision to Come to Taiwan I believe that it is nothing short of a miracle that I am in Taiwan. In order to understand how I got here, we have to go back to my undergraduate years. I enjoyed my four years at the University of South Carolina, a college in my home state where I found my best friends, subjects that intrigued me, and issues I wanted to stand up for. What I did not find, and still do not know to this day, is the answer to this question: “So, what are you going to do next?” I have always hated this question, no matter whether it comes from well-meaning strangers, family members, friends, or academic colleagues. It is such a loaded question, one that to me implies “I know what you are doing now is great, but you need to stop living in this moment and create a 5-year plan, specifically one that abides by our societal timeline – education, job, family, retirement.” Now I am not saying that people should not plan for the things that they want in their future, but other people have no right to stress us out with this question and

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IEA Seminar Taiwan: A Taste of Asia

My International Education Administrators trip to Taiwan was full of delightful surprises, including wonderful food, amazing Taiwanese people and unforgettable new colleagues from the U.S.  There are countless moments that struck me during my two weeks in Taiwan as we visited 16 universities and five foreign agencies.  Overall, I felt honored to be a Fulbright and to be included in this inaugural experience.   This honor was elevated when my group heard the first female president of Taiwan address the Fulbright Scholars of South East Asia.  Moreover, our group was encouraged to make contacts with U.S. Fulbright Scholars and discuss their ground-breaking work.  Indeed, we met with Taiwanese Alumni Fulbright Scholars to discuss the impact of Fulbright on their lives.  As a U.S. Fulbright Scholar-Brazil ’91, I shared immense pride in the accomplishment of these individuals.  Additionally, as an IEA participant, I was encouraged to advise my students and faculty to pursue these opportunities.  When  I returned home, I learned that two of my students had been awarded Fulbrights – one an ETA and one a Fulbright Student Award. During our trip to Taiwan, we met the minister of Foreign Affairs.  She was gracious and answered all of our questions.  We

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The design and learning analytics of minimized collaborative scientific problem-solving activities considering cultural differences

Summary of work Researchers and educators consider CPS as one of the core competencies of the 21st century. However, students often fail to solve a problem as they do not coordinate with peers to reflect upon their CPS activities. To help teachers develop collaborative activities to foster CPS ability, my work in the host institute focused on two main parts: the development of collaborative science learning activities and the analysis of active learning practice, specifically the collaborative learning practice, in the new ALCs. Regarding the collaborative science learning activity, my work has implemented twenty CPS simulations for CPS learning activities, both in Chinese and English, and has established a collaboration network between multiple countries including the European Union, Spain, Thailand and Singapore. Regarding the analysis of active learning practices, the work in the host institution and my prior works were integrated to form a Pedagogy, Space, and Technology (PST) model of space and technology design in supporting collaborative learning on campus which was featured by the IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technology as one of the keynote speeches of The 18th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies in Bombay. Background It has been stressed by social constructivists that in-depth learning occurs

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When Ability-Grouping Program Meets Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS)

Considering the whole process of my teaching career a chapter book, to be able to come to America and learn again seems to be the best chapter of all. It is like a dream come true. I would like to express my sincere gratitude to The U.S. Department of State and Fulbright Taiwan Commission for granting me the prestigious opportunity of becoming a part of the Fulbright Distinguished Awards in Teaching Program for International Teachers (FDAI). It has been a fruitful journey. Not only did the program broaden my horizon as a teacher, but it also provided potential solutions to the challenges I am facing in the classroom.  Although my adventure in the U.S. was disrupted by the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic, the amount and value of information collected was still overwhelming. Eventually, the report of my inquiry project will serve as a resource bank of research-based teaching practices for the teachers who try to teach ability-grouped classrooms in Taiwan’s elementary schools.  Focus Identified  Taiwanese English teachers recognize the biggest challenge in the classroom as the gaps that exist between students’ proficiency levels. These gaps make it difficult to teach effectively. Multiple attempts including in-class peer tutoring, pull-out morning remedial

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My FLTA FOLIO

CHAPTER 1 Where I Am From  I am TzuChun Lin, a 2019-2020 FLTA grant fromTaiwan. I started my magical journey at Georgia Southern University as a Chinese Instructor and an audit student. I had to teach Chinese 1001 three times a week and chose two to four courses as an audit student. In both fall and spring semester, I experienced how well-educated an American college student is, and how the university played a supportive role to help each student to become successful.  Taiwan, where most countries did not recognize us as a country, has the freedom of speech, press, religion and assembling. We can vote for our president, mayor, and public issues that are related to our rights. Taiwanese are kind, friendly and we can help the world in many different ways. During the pandemic of Covid-19, Taiwan showed caution of the virus ahead of all the other countries and set up a great model of how to prevent the spread of coronavirus.  CHAPTER 2 Foreign Language Teaching Assistant (FLTA)  The United States Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) sponsors Fulbright FLTA Program. It is designed to develop Americans’ knowledge of foreign cultures and languages by

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Introduction to the 228 Incident in Taiwan for K-12 Education Classes at George Washington University

Preface The modern history of Taiwan can be divided into five parts: the Dutch period (1624-1662), the kingdom of Cheng period (1662-1683), the Qing Dynasty period (1683-1895), the Japanese colonial period (1895-1945), and the postwar period (1945-present). The postwar period in Taiwan is very different from its previous periods. The most significant differences are the achievement of democratization and the independence movement.      Both democratization and the independence movement are related to or originated in the February 28 Incident (also known as 228) that happened in 1947. If we want to understand the complicated political changes and disputes or social conflicts in Taiwan, the 228 Incident offers an essential historical background. Besides, the Taiwan issue also relates to the regional security of East Asia and the national security of the United States. The 228 Incident can also provide a historical and geopolitical perspective for thinking about the Taiwan issue. To learn Taiwan’s postwar history, the 228 Incident is a necessary step. This article attempts to introduce this historical event that happened in Taiwan and points out its affiliation with the regional security of East Asia through the history of  US policy toward Taiwan.       The cause of the 228 Incident Taiwan was

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A Superlative Professional Development Experience in Taiwan

What a tremendous privilege it was to participate in this program and work with the staff of Fulbright Taiwan.  The staff did a great job coordinating the whole program. They took excellent care of us from the initial contact to the arrangement of our return trip to the airport when the program was over. The itinerary was an almost perfect balance of visits to schools, agency visits, cultural sites, informational lectures, and free time.  I learned so much about Taiwan’s higher education system, its history, contemporary cross-strait relations, and about the various indigenous peoples of Taiwan.  The visits to a variety of institutions were also very informative and revealed a wealth of opportunities.  One of the many highlights was an opportunity to hear the President of Taiwan speak to a gathering of Fulbright recipients from all around the region that had gathered in Taipei for a research conference. Having visited mainland China on many occasions, I was able to observe the unique opportunities in Taiwan in contrast with opportunities on the mainland. One of the reasons I wanted to go to Taiwan was to investigate opportunities that are being overlooked in the shadow of mainland China.   The advantages that I

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Study in the Land of Lincoln

I am grateful for the funding and support that the Fulbright Program offers me. Also, writing this reflective essay provides me a great opportunity to think and document what I have experienced in the past year. My journey in the United States so far, especially in the state of Illinois, can be divided into three categories: 1) study, 2) research, and 3) life. Study I am studying my doctoral degree in Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In the first semester at U of I, I was amazed by the flexibility that students in my program could have in the selection of courses. When I was studying in Taiwan, I did not really have to think what classes to take as most of the courses were mandatory. Thus, my first task as a PhD student was to explore and plan my coursework that best suits my research field. I ended up registering for three courses and one independent study with my academic advisor. The first two courses I chose  both involved quantitative methodologies, specifically econometrics, offered by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Economics. On the one hand, I was curious about how people in the field

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Research
& Reflections